Alcheringa, New Series 1975, vol.1 no. 1   

Edition Year Editors Pages Download
Volume One, Issue One New Series, 1975 Dennis Tedlock & Jerome Rothenberg 156 PDF, 4.6 MB
    Editorial Assistant: Paul Kahn
  Contributing Editors: David Antin, Kofi Awoonor, Ulli Beier,
  Stanley Diamond, Charles Doria, Harris Lenowitz, Dell Hymes,
  David P. McAllester, William Mullen, Simon Ortiz, Gary Snyder,
  Nathaniel Tarn
   

ISSUE INDEX
IMAGE 156 OF 156






RECORD INSERT



Side 1, MP3, 8.7 MB  
Side 2, MP3, 8.6 MB  

(both sides) Jaime de Angulo, The Story of the Gilak Monster and his Sister the Ceremonial Drum, Reproduced by permission of the Pacifica Foundation, Los Angeles
 




The Ways of Alcheringa

Jerome Rothenberg and Denis Tedlock, New Series Editorial


As in the five issues of the Old Series, the new ALCHERINGA will continue to publish, from all over the world, transcriptions and translations of oral poems from living traditions, ancient texts with oral roots, and modern experiments in oral poetry. There will be songs, chants, prayers, visions and dreams, sacred narratives, fictional narratives, histories, ritual scenarios, praises, namings, word games, riddles, proverbs, sermons. These will take the shape of performable scripts (meant to be read aloud rather than silently), experiments in typography, diagrams, and insert disc recordings.

In addition to poems, ALCHERINGA will publish, more often than in the past, essays dealing with problems of translation and presentation, interviews with oral performers, and explorations of the meaning of tribal cultures for Western urban culture. To these established topics will be added the problem of the sacred/powerful dimension of language and its possible restoration in English: just as we have desecrated the landscape, so we have carelessly depleted the potent resources of language. In tribal ontologies, cosmologies, and the poetries that present them may be found the answers, or the beginnings of the answers, to both these problems.

Philosophically, ALCHERINGA finds itself close to hermeneutic phenomenology. In the words of Paul Ricoeur:

We wish to recharge language, start again from the fullness of language.... The same age develops the possibility of emptying language and the possibility of filling it anew. It is therefore no yearning for a sunken Atlantis that urges us on, but the hope of a re-creation of language. Beyond the wastelands of critical thought, we seek to be challenged anew.

The poets of ALCHERINGA start with the voice. The essayists will look, ultimately, to the very origins of poetry. ALCHERINGA will be radical — that is, going to the center — in approaching the Word.